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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/108

English Title: Accelerating growth. Women in science and technology in the Arab Middle East
Author/Creator: ATIC
Type of publication: Other Publication
Bibliographic reference: ATIC 2012, Accelerating growth. Women in science and technology in the Arab Middle East. A report from the Economist Intelligence Unit, ATIC, Abu Dhabi; Downloaded on 10/3/2014, Available at: http://www.managementthinking.eiu.com/sites/default/files/downloads/Women%20in%20science%20and%20technology%20WEB.pdf
Abstract: Arab governments are fostering growth in science and technology in the Middle East. In doing so, the region’s leaders, from policy makers to business executives, are increasingly acknowledging the role of women in securing a sustainable economic future. While young women are increasingly participating in science and technology programmes at school and university, there is room for further improvement in education standards overall. More Arab women than men are graduating in science, but not all are finding their way into post-graduate research or into the workplace. This study, based on desk research and on in-depth interviews with experts including policymakers, academics and business people, discusses the challenges faced by women in science and technology in the Arab Middle East. The research examines the role of women scientists and technologists among Arab nations; the state of science and technology education in the region; and the prospects for women scientists in the workplace. Among the findings of the study is that female participation in science and technology education is strong as young women are achieving better grades that their male counterparts, however, a disconnect remains between scientific education and the labour market for these young women. After completing tertiary scientific education, women are less likely than men to pursue a career in science and technology.The study concludes that more initiatives are needed to motivate women scientists to participate in the workforce.
Original abstract of the author: No
Field of science: Science, mathematics and computing
Engineering, manufacturing and construction
Relation with Gender and Science topics: Vertical Segregation
Geographical coverage: Algeria
Egypt
Jordan
Lebanon
Libya
Palestine-administered areas
Syrian Arab Republic
Time coverage: 2000s
Methodological approach: Conceptual
Website address: http://www.managementthinking.eiu.com/sites/default/files/downloads/Women%20in%20science%20and%20technology%20WEB.pdf
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